Orion Spaceprobe 130ST Review: Best Budget Telescope?

Orion Spaceprobe 130ST Review:

Have you ever wondered how one of the world’s greatest scientists Sir Isaac Newton used to gaze at the stars? When he used to look at the sky and get all warmed up with science and mystery, he never knew that later the world will have something called a Newtonian telescope.

These are the telescopes that are made using the same method that Sir Isaac Newton made his telescope with.

But from that method, the world of telescopes have now created something awesome for all the beginner and intermediate astronomers out there. One of the best Newtonian telescopes in the market has to be the Orion Spaceprobe 130ST.

In this Orion Spaceprobe 130ST review, I will let you know about everything that this bad boy has to offer. Yes, you can call it the badass bad boy of the telescope world.

With the said review, you will be able to judge if the telescope is worth spending money on or not.

So, let’s get started!

Orion Spaceprobe 130ST: A General Overview


According to market research, Orion Spaceprobe 130ST is probably the most wanted Equatorial Reflector Telescope that Orion has to offer. Orion, a 40-year-old company that has changed the telescope game for 4 decades, has created a beautiful piece of equipment for the intermediate and beginner level astronomers out there.

If you’re an astronomer by hobby or if you are an astronomer by profession, this is the perfect equipment to have at home or at your workplace.

Why? Because it covers both aspects accordingly with its design, simplicity, and accuracy.

With the 130ST’s clear and accurate image, you can gaze at the sky and find out amazing things about the planets in our solar system and beyond.

For beginners, gazing is okay. But for intermediates, only gazing is not enough. So being an intermediate tool, you can inspect and find out every possible detail of the planets and moons of our solar system with ease. You can guess the optical power of the telescope.

The best part of having a Newtonian telescope is that you can have a wider view than other telescope mechanisms. That gives you a sheer advantage over other telescopes, you can zoom as much as you need, and have a maximized view of the focused object on the convex secondary mirror of the telescope.

The convex-concave mirror method gives you an optical advantage that enables you to see the night sky with an eye of an astronomer, rather than just a hobbyist.

The technology inside the Spaceprobe is literally amazing. With the 100 to 150mm aperture, it will allow you to see every planet of our solar system and even look far beyond into other galaxies and star clusters. The tube design is only 24″, so you know that it’s portable. The 130mm optical diameter and 650mm focal length have the perfect f/5.0 focal ratio.

You can not only see what others have discovered. No sir, you might wind up finding something new on your own.

The telescope comes with a tripod on which you can place it and share the view with your family as well because it’s really easy to take care of and handle.

Also, Orion offers a really suitable price. Just so you know, Newtonian telescopes have a very simple mechanism, thus, the price of the telescopes having this mechanism is cheap and Orion offers the best possible one.

So, if you’re willing to start your life as an astronomer or if you’re looking for an upgrade to an intermediate telescope, this is the one you need.

Features:

Orion Spaaceprobe 130ST Review

Maximized Magnification:

For beginners, the maximum magnification you’ll be looking for is not more than 180x. That enables you to gaze into the solar system. But the 130ST offers magnification up to 260x. That will not only give you an intermediate view but also, will let you start your astronomy journey with the solar system and beyond.

Durable and Portable:

Most of the telescope manufacturers think that you will but a telescope and keep it at home or at your workplace forever. But the thing that they forget to keep in mind that your home or your workplace might change in the course of time.

Orion kept that in mind and made sure that you can move your telescope with ease. It is only 24″ in length and only weighs about 24pounds at best. That really less than usual telescopes. And because it’s portable, the build is really rugged and is made with high-quality material. 

Mounting:

Most telescopes come with mounting options. But this one has a special option. The tripod that it comes with is really sturdy and adjustable according to your preferred height option. Most importantly, the mounting ensures maximum stability.

So, you may move your telescope accidentally, but the adjustments will be the same as before the movement.

Includes:

With the Orion Spaceprobe 130ST, you’ll get everything you need. You will get two 1.25″ Sirius Plossl eyepieces. 10.0mm-65x and 25.0mm-26x. The package contains an aluminum tripod, a collimation cap, a 6×30 finderscope, 1.25″ rack and pinion focuser, and Starry Night astronomy software.

Affordability:

As I have said earlier, Newtonian telescopes are cheap as they have a simple mechanism. But there are many manufacturers that will try to take advantage of the beginners who know nothing about telescopes. That’s why you can trust Orion.

They have this honesty that they charge the lowest price they can. So, there’s absolutely nothing to worry about the affordability of the Orion Spaceprobe 130ST.

Warranty:

Just like any other Orion product, this one also comes with a one-year manufacturer’s warranty. After buying, if you find any flaws in the mechanism or the build, you can ask for an immediate exchange from the company. So, if you’re sure enough to buy a telescope, this is the one to give a shot.

Specification

  • Dimension of Package: 24 x 24 x 51 inches
  • Weight: 24.2 pounds
  • Primary Mirror Diameter: 5.1 inches
  • Focal length: 650mm
  • Optical Diameter: 130mm
  • Focal ratio: f/5.0
  • Tube: made of steel. Length 24 inches
  • Lowest useful magnification: 19x
  • Highest useful magnification: 260x

Pros

  • The 5.1 aperture size is more than enough to look at the moons and other planets properly
  • A wider view of the focused object
  • An aluminum tripod ensures maximized stability
  • The Newtonian mechanism is very simple to understand and use
  • The f/5.0 focus is the best focus you can ask to inspect galaxies far beyond our solar system
  • The package includes everything you need. You don’t need to make any adjustments and absolutely don’t need to buy anything more than the telescope itself
  • Price is very much affordable for beginners
  • The focusing motion is 2x per mm which is really smooth
  • Finderscope adjustments are really easy
  • Collimation with the hand is possible but the cap is included with the telescope just in case
  • Maximum focus up to 260x
  • Portable and really easy to carry
  • Very easy to use and takes very little time to get used to.

Cons

  • As it’s a beginner telescope as well, intermediate users may have to fight with the lights
  • Instructions are not the best among all telescopes
  • Some components of the telescopes are made of plastic

Where Can You Find The Orion Spaceprobe 130ST?

The Orion Spaceprobe 130ST is sold absolutely every retail and wholesale telescope/ astronomy shops all over the USA. So, it’s a bit hard for other countries to buy one from the USA and ship it to their countries.

That’s why I highly encourage everyone to buy the telescope from Amazon. As they offer a special discount the price on special occasions and usual sale seasons. Also, you might get free shipping to your home.

To check the latest price on Amazon, click here.

What Can You See With The Orion Spaceprobe 130ST?

With most beginner telescopes, you will be able to see only within the solar system, up till Neptune or Pluto if you’re lucky.

But the Spaceprobe offers a bit more than just our solar system:

  • If light pollution is minimal, you might get a clear picture of the Canis Major Dwarf Galaxy
  • You can inspect the surface of Jupiter
  • Pluto is visible if the sky is clear
  • You can check the ring of Saturn clearly

Maintenance Tips for Orion Spaceprobe 130ST

To be honest, the durability of any device depends on how well you’re maintaining it. So, to make the best use from the Spaceprobe 130ST you should maintain and handle it with care.

Follow the given tips and you can expect it to stay fine for a longer period of time:

  1. Most importantly, place the telescope at a place where people don’t walk or pass by. Especially, kids. Kids can be pretty much unconscious with things that are important to us. Refrain yourself from moving the telescope too often
  2. Keep the lens cap on whenever you’re not using the telescope. The cap is given to protect the optics of the telescope and also the glass inside. It will prevent the glass from getting scratches.
  3. Do not apply regular use detergent or soap on your telescope. Not on the body and never even think of washing the glass with any washing products. If there’s an unexpected stain, seek help from professionals. Otherwise, use a clean microfiber cloth to gently rub the dust off. Do clean the telescope every now and then. You could keep the telescope covered with a piece of cloth to keep it dust-free.

Final Verdict

So, that’s all for the Orion Spaceprobe 130ST review. If you have gone through everything, you will be able to make a decision whether it’s worth buying or not. Always keep one thing in mind, nothing is without an error. So, this telescope also has some errors.

But if you’re thinking of making the best use of your telescope budget, this will be a pretty damn good device to buy as a beginner and also as an intermediate astronomer.

So, if you’re willing to start your journey with the Orion Spaceprobe 130ST as a beginner or want an upgrade from the previous telescope, you can check the prices on Amazon, to do that click here.

This telescope is worth giving a shot. You will not regret this decision at all.

 

Muntaseer

I have wondered how the Stars and Moons look like for many years. I’ve fallen in love with Cosmology since I was a boy. I am writing these articles to share my love for astronomy with you.

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